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Reasearch on Chinese medicine and interstitial cystitis

Last updated: 12 March, 2017
by Steven Clavey, Traditional Chinese Gynaecology

Complete response to acupuncture therapy in female patients with refractory interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

The results of this study suggest that acupuncture appears to be an effective, useful, non-invasive method in IC/BPS patients. It can be used as an appropriate treatment method not only in refractory but also in IC patients since it is rather advantageous compared to other treating agents.

Ginekol Pol. 2017;88(2):61-67. doi: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0013.

Sönmez MG, Kozanhan B.

OBJECTIVES: Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a considerable issue in urology and gynecology and unfortunately, the treatment options recommended are not fully efficient. Therefore, in this study we aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment in patients with refractory IC/BPS.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: 12 refractory IC/BPS female patients received ten sessions of acupuncture twice a week. The visual analog score (VAS), interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI), interstitial cystitis problem index (ICPI), O’Leary-Saint symptom score (OSS), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), Pelvic pain and urgency & frequency patient symptom scale tests (PUF) and maximum voided volume (MVV) was completed in 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th months following the treatment.

RESULTS: There was a statistically significant decrease in all of the scores evaluated at first month compared with the baseline. While the change in VAS score in 1, 3, 6 and 12th months were found statistically significant, measurements of ICSI, OSS and PUF scores and MVV values in the 6th and 12th months and ICPI and PHQ scores in the 12th month were not found statistically significant compared to the pre-treatment period. Response to treatment for the first three months after acupuncture application was (100%), but this ratio was measured as 33.3% (4/12) in the sixth month and 16.6% in the 12th month (2/12).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that acupuncture appears to be an effective, useful, non-invasive method in IC/BPS patients. It can be used as an appropriate treatment method not only in refractory but also in IC patients since it is rather advantageous compared to other treating agents.

 

 

Effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for the treatment of refractory interstitial cystitis.

“Although its precise mechanism of action is unclear, this study suggests that acupuncture and moxibustion treatment may be a complementary and alternative therapeutic option for refractory IC

Hinyokika Kiyo. 2013 May;59(5):265-9.

[Article in Japanese]

Katayama Y1, Nakahara K, Shitamura T, Mukai S, Wakeda H, Yamashita Y, Inoue K, Nose K, Kamoto T.

The efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment was examined on eight female patients with refractory interstitial cystitis (IC) who had been treated conservatively with hydrodistension, intravesical instillation of dimethyl sulfoxide, or oral medication. These patients had received hydrodistension on an average of 2.3±1.8 times. Moxa needles were applied to Ciliao in bladder meridian 32 and Xialiao in bladder meridian 34, and electroacupuncture was performed on Zhongliao in bladder meridian 33 at 3 Hz for 20 min once a week.

The bladder condition was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, the O’Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI), the Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI), and the maximum voided volume (MVV).

After 3 months, patients who showed a reduction of >2 in their VAS score, reduction of <30% of ICSI and ICPI, and increase of >100 ml MVV were considered responders. There were three responders, and after repeated therapy to maintain these effects, they no longer required hydrodistension. Two responders had no recurrence for 48 months or more. Acupuncture and moxibustion resulted in improvement in 38% of the patients (3/8) with refractory IC, and repeated therapy maintained the therapeutic effects.

This therapy is traditional and relatively noninvasive. Although its precise mechanism of action is unclear, this study suggests that acupuncture and moxibustion treatment may be a complementary and alternative therapeutic option for refractory IC.

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