Traditional Chinese Medical Clinic, 126 Russell Street, Melbourne.
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Pain

Last updated: 12 February, 2018
by Kim Riley, Gynaecological Herbs and Acupuncture

Pains including pain from headaches, lower backache, abdominal pain and joint pains and aches are treated with herbs and, if necessary, acupuncture [learn more]. In some cases techniques for home pain relief may be taught, such as moxibustion. Stiff neck and shoulders can be helped with acupuncture and cupping, but can often be prevented by not going out in the morning with wet hair. Your mother was right, for once.

Headaches include migraines and other stubborn headaches [learn more] for which other treatments have not been effective. Often the reason is that there are several causative factors intertwined, and these need to be teased out, unravelled and eliminated before the headaches stop completely. Unexplained vertigo and dizziness usually respond quite well to either acupuncture or herbal treatment [learn more]. Sinus may also cause headache (see Respiratory Disorders, and this link).

Abdominal pain can also be very complicated in terms of its causative factors. Chinese medicine is particularly useful [learn more here  and see the pdf entitled Chinese herbs and abdominal pain] when Western examinations are unable to identify the cause of the pain, because we use a different set of parameters (more specific attention to the nature and timing of the pain, for example, in conjunction with other relevant information obtained through pulse and tongue diagnosis) to determine what is happening and how to treat it. In cases where there is a Western diagnosis, but no really viable Western treatment, again Chinese medicine can sometimes offer a way forward. This may include ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease.

If there is any doubt your practitioner may take advantage of some of the diagnostic technology in which Western medicine is superior, such as ultrasound imaging, by asking for a second opinion through your GP. If the pain is gynaecological, patients will be referred to that department.

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